Archive for the ‘Dr. Allan Lorincz’ Category

Treatment of bullous pempigoid with nicotinamide prevents complications of using steroids – pioneered by Dr. Allan Lorincz

January 11, 2015

The Treatment of Bullous Pemphigoid with Tetracycline and Niacinamide. A Preliminary Report.

 Arch Dermatol. 1986 Jun;122(6):670-4.

Berk, MA, and Lorincz, AL

Abstract

Patients with moderate to severe bullous pemphigoid are usually treated with systemic corticosteroids. Four patients were treated with tetracycline hydrochloride and niacinamide because of the steroid-sparing anti-inflammatory properties of these agents. An excellent clinical response free of side effects was observed in all patients. The lesions recurred whenever treatment was discontinued. It is believed that these drugs suppress the complement-mediated inflammatory response at the basement membrane zone by suppressing neutrophil chemotaxis and mediators of the inflammatory response in this bullous disease.
PMID:
2940979
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]
____________________________________________________
As the daughter of Dr. Allan Lorincz, as well as, due to my knowledge as a retired scientist and physician, I can tell you that Dr. Lorincz was one of the world renowned dematologists who warned of dangers of steroids, Accutane (isotretinoid), and over-use of antibiotics. He developed this treatment of bullous pemphigoid using the anti-inflammatory properties of nicotinamide (a water soluble form of Vit B3) and advocated its use in acne and other inflammatory conditions. As nicotinamide is water soluble, it is very safe if used in less than 3 gram per day doses. The dose for acne and other inflammatory conditions per Dr. Lorincz should be 500 mg three times per day which can be bought without a prescription and taken three times per day every 8 hours. He successfully used it on many patients during his career at the University of Chicago, which ended upon his retirement in 2005 and his death in 2010.
See:

Dermatology and the Evolution of Therapies to Control Inflammatory Tissue Injury

Arch Dermatol. 1994 Jun;130(6):781-2.
PMID: 8002652 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]
Advertisements

%d bloggers like this: